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  • From “Olivia, Mourning”

  • For a moment she imagined the forlorn figure she must present – draped in black, stark against the glare of the snow, with the rust-colored splash of Tobey’s wide-brimmed felt hat on her head. She remembered the heavy oil paintings that hung in the public library over in Hillsong and could imagine a similar one of her, its neatly lettered caption reading “Orphan in Snow.” She clenched her jaw tight and stepped onto the walk, determined that no one was…

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  • Books by James Alexander Thom

  • I should be ashamed to admit that I only recently discovered this author when one of his books (Follow the River) and then another (The Sign-Talker) were discounted and advertised on BookBub. I look forward to reading more, despite how demoralizing an experience that is for an author of historical fiction who is not named James Alexander Thom. Never mind the amount of research this man does – that could easily result in a stunningly boring book. But in Thom’s…

  • From “The Lonely Tree”

  •   When Tonia went down to throw out the trash one evening, she saw Rina standing on the other side of the street, whispering with Shai, one of the older neighborhood boys. She had just opened her mouth to shout "Rina has a boyfriend!" when Shai pointed at her. She tossed the garbage in the bin and skipped over to join them. "She"s too little," Rina said. "My mother would kill me if we got caught." "So we won"t get…

  • Get Even More Serious

  • You know how you nag your kids? Watch out –  they grow up and start nagging you right back. Sometimes it's even worse than that. I found myself being scolded that just because I don't enjoy doing something, that doesn't mean I don't have to do it. Not everything in life is fun. In a previous post I wrote about learning to take myself seriously as a writer. But at least that's something I enjoy doing. Then the minute I…

  • Cane River by Lalita Tademy – Great Historical Fiction/History

  • I first read this book over a decade ago, but recently picked it up again, and again had trouble putting it down. Based on the author's years of research into her own family's history in a small community in Louisiana before, during, and after the Civil War, it takes an unblinking look at the complicated relationships between slaveholders (black and white), slaves, and free people of color, often focusing on white fathers and their mixed race children. It is extremely…